We Remember Your Childhood Well Essays

Nobody hurt you. Nobody turned off the light and arguedwith somebody else all night. The bad man on the moorswas only a movie you saw. Nobody locked the door.

Your questions were answered fully. No. That didn't occur.You couldn't sing anyway, cared less. The moment's a blur, a Film Funlaughing itself to death in the coal fire. Anyone's guess.

Nobody forced you. You wanted to go that day. Begged. You chosethe dress. Here are the pictures, look at you. Look at us all,smiling and waving, younger. The whole thing is inside your head.

What you recall are impressions; we have the facts. We called the tune.The secret police of your childhood were older and wiser than you, biggerthan you. Call back the sound of their voices. Boom. Boom. Boom.

Nobody sent you away. That was an extra holiday, with peopleyou seemed to like. They were firm, there was nothing to fear.There was none but yourself to blame if it ended in tears.

What does it matter now? No, no, nobody left the skidmarks of sinon your soul and laid you wide open for Hell. You were loved.Always. We did what was best. We remember your childhood well.

The poem is a dramatic monologue [monologue: An extended speech performed by one person only ]: an angry parent (or parents) is talking to a grown-up child. The parent denies that the child was ever hurt or mistreated in any way, although it's clear that the child remembers things very differently...

The speaker sounds very much on the defensive: clearly the grown-up child has complained about something or asked an awkward question. The parent insists that the child was brought up well and was loved, and suggests that if the child thinks otherwise, they must be imagining it - (line 9).

Presentation on theme: "Carol Ann DuffY."— Presentation transcript:

1 Carol Ann DuffY

2 We remember your childhood well
Think about the title.The poem is a dramatic monologue:The speaker sounds very much on the defensive: clearly the grown-up child has complained about something or asked an awkward question. The parent insists that the child was brought up well and was loved

3 IOC Interactive oral commentary at the church
You will choose a poem randomlyYou will have 20 minutes to prepare your commentary in a quiet roomYou will be escorted to my room and sit across the table from me and talk for 8 minutes about the poem.Commentary needs to be formal, organized and reveal how well you are able to identify poetic features and how they support the poet’s purpose.

4 I will give you a minute warning to wrap it up.
I will ask some follow up questions and we have a short 2 minute discussion on the poemThen we transition to a ten minute discussion on either Lear or SL. (Again I go down a list of questions and where you are when you walk in is what I ask.

5 Carol Ann Duffy

6 Born on December 23 1955, in Glasgow, Scotland's largest city.
Attended Liverpool University

7 The first female, Scottish Poet Laureate in the role's 400 year history,
Accepted position in 2009“the queen of modern British poetry"

8 "The beginning of a poem is always a moment of tiny revelation, a new way of seeing something, which almost simultaneously attracts language to it - and then the impulse is to catch that with a pen and paper.” Carol Duffy

9 Education for Leisure

10 Dramatic Situation Dramatic monologue
Speaker is a young adolescent male who is bored and tired of being ignored, overlooked. He wants attention in the worst way…by committing Violence, playing god, causing destruction and fear as a means of feeling powerful.Speaking to the readerTone is sinister: Today I am going to kill somethingTone is also ironic: contrast between the speaker’s view of himself and reality.

11 Structure Regular lined verses Poem moves from a threat to action
Five stanzas - four lines eachPoem moves from a threat to actionBuilds tension with escalating images of violenceSyntax: Short “jabbing” sentences. …Why?Other lines that are more lyricalLine 4Last line

12 STRUCTURE Punctuation Use of end stops and enjambment. Title?
Ironic. Leisure of the unemployed, the drop outs, the underclass. Time on their hands because they have either dropped out of school or have been expelled.

13 Language Colloquial diction, slang direct address at end
Connotation of the word “genius”We usually associate the word with creativity, but here word is used with irony. Not as bright as he thinks. Irony of a poor education. “God”: association of omnipresent being who created the world, but here used to show how speaker takes joy in destruction: “I see that it is good.” Capable only of destruction, not creation

14 Language Imagery: Grey with boredom [day] Pavements Glitter:
Interesting contrast. Glitter with what?(blood, something to do?)

15 language Allusion to Gloucester’s line in King Lear.(WHY?)
Image of fly being squashedAnother Language. ( death vs language of art)Ironic humor to show discrepancy between speaker’s egotistical view of himself and our view of him.

16 Musical Devices? Unrhymed free verse
Non-metrical (pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.)Except for some Iambic meter in lyrical lines (line 4 and last line) (yearning)Flat, plodding rhythm…reinforces the monotony of his life.

17 Thesis Duffy uses______________,___________,
and__________________to show_________________________.Duffy uses colloquial diction, allusions to God, and a threatening tone to dramatize the increasingly violent actions of a frustrated and disenfranchised youth.

18 War PhotographerFrom Duffy’s first collection: Standing Female Nude 1985

19 Warm upTake your commentary and either read it to partner, or tell them what you discovered about the poem.If you were not here on Friday, read the poem on your own and write down your first impressions of it. What is it about? Identify two most significant poetic features.

20 War PhotographerThe poem comes from Duffy’s friendship with Don McCullin and Philip Jones Griffiths, two well-respected stills photographers who specialised in war photography.Duffy is fascinated by what makes someone do such a job and how they feel about being in situations where a choice often has to be made between recording horrific events, and helping.

21 Vietnam War

22

23 Vietnam

24 Iraq, 2005

25 Iran, 1979

26 War Photographer Terms:
Alliteration: repetition of (usually) consonant sounds at the beginning of a sentence. Big Bad BearConnotation: the emotional association we have with a word.Caesura: a pause within a line of poetry. Used for dramatic effect, or to create tension, surpriseDiction: word choice (contributes to tone)Imagery: use of figurative language to create images in mind of reader

27 Make notes on the structure of the first verse
In his darkroom he is finally alonewith spools of suffering set out in ordered rows.The only light is red and softly glows,as though this were a church and hea priest preparing to intone a Mass.Belfast. Beirut. Phnom Penh. All flesh is grass.Is this continued throughout? Why?

28 Structure 4 stanzas 6 lines per stanza
Regular rhyme scheme – ABBCDD, etc.WHY?Imposes order in the chaos of warLike the photographer – order with the photos, making sense of the chaos

29 Imagery Four groups…underline and analyze images in assigned stanza.
how do they support topic & theme of poem?First by selfDiscuss with group-class

30 In his darkroom he is finally alone
with spools of suffering set out in ordered rows.The only light is red and softly glows,as though this were a church and hea priest preparing to intone a Mass.Belfast. Beirut. Phnom Penh. All flesh is grass.

31 In his darkroom he is finally alone
with spools of suffering set out in ordered rows.The only light is red and softly glows,as though this were a church and hea priest preparing to atone a Mass.Belfast. Beirut. Phnom Penh. All flesh is grass.

32 alliteration – what is the effect?
Contrast to what?alliteration – what is the effect?What are the connotations of the colours?In his darkroom he is finally alonewith spools of suffering set out in ordered rows.The only light is red and softly glows,as though this were a church and hea priest preparing to atone a Mass.Belfast. Beirut. Phnom Penh. All flesh is grass.regularity/order – reflects structureSuggestion of graves/bodiesLitany of horror; what is the effect of the caesura?Simile – reverence and devotion to the picturesIsaiah 40:6 – shortness of life

33 He has a job to do. Solutions slop in trays
beneath his hands which did not tremble thenthough seem to now. Rural England. Home againto ordinary pain which simple weather can dispel,to fields which don’t explode beneath the feetof running children in nightmare heat.

34 Why did they not tremble then? Why now?
Ambiguity – chemicals/solutions to warImplies carelessnessHe has a job to do. Solutions slop in traysbeneath his hands which did not tremble thenthough seem to now. Rural England. Home againto ordinary pain which simple weather can dispel,to fields which don’t explode beneath the feetof running children in nightmare heat.Why did they not tremble then? Why now?Suggests idyllic lifeContrast: barefoot children running in grass for fun/those running from war – end of innocence and, possibly, life.True meaning to the poem - contrastCannot compare to pain of war

35 Something is happening. A stranger’s features
faintly start to twist before his eyes,a half-formed ghost. He remembers the criesof this man’s wife, how he sought approvalWithout words to do what someone mustand how the blood stained into foreign dust.

36 Ambiguous: Literal – developing the photo. Figurative – person in pain
Something is happening. A stranger’s featuresfaintly start to twist before his eyes,a half-formed ghost. He remembers the criesof this man’s wife, how he sought approvalWithout words to do what someone mustand how the blood stained into foreign dust.Photographer’s dilemma – has a job to do.Metaphor – 1. image on photo, 2. death

37 A hundred agonies in black-and-white
from which his editor will pick out five or sixfor Sunday’s supplement. The reader’s eyeballs prickwith tears between the bath and pre-lunch beers.From the aeroplane he stares impassively at whereHe earns his living and they do not care

38 Suggests they are used for entertainment
PhotoGood/evilTruth/liesTrivialises; we are only moved momentarilyContrast to war zoneA hundred agonies in black-and-whitefrom which his editor will pick out five or sixfor Sunday’s supplement. The reader’s eyeballs prickwith tears between the bath and pre-lunch beers.From the aeroplane he stares impassively at whereHe earns his living and they do not care.En route to another assignment; poem is cyclical; unceasing warsChooses photos to suit the article; don’t convey the full horror of warWho are they?Suggests they are used for entertainment

39 Discussion PointsHow do you think this photographer feels about their job? Pride or guilt?How do you think Duffy feels towards the newspaper editors?What does Duffy seem to be suggesting about the way the readers react to seeing these images?What is Duffy trying to point out about life in Britain compared to Beirut etc?Themes?

40 DictionWhich words or phrases seem significant in contributing to the tone of the poem?For example alone…in first stanzaSuggests isolation, detachment.

41 Theme?Effects of warShows trauma caused by witnessing tragedy, horrors of war.Juxtaposition of photographer’s inner conflict, (being impassive, objective among such horror) and the public’s fleeting interest and lack of concern for such events..

42 Group ThesisHow does author +verb+ lit. feature+ verb+lit. effect + why.War PhotographerDuffy uses________, ______, and ______ to reveal_______________.Write it down and share with class. turn it in.

43 Thesis exampleDuffy uses a regular rhyme scheme, a shifting tone, and the contrasting imagery of war and rural England to reveal the cyclical nature of conflict and the impassivity that some feel toward others’ suffering.

44 termsColloquialism: in a conversational manner that may include slang:Connotations: emotional association a reader has for a certain word:God …. in Education it has a – connotation not as creator but destroyer.Alliteration: repetition of consonant sounds at beginning of sentences;Assonance: repetition of same vowel sound: open, broken; remembered, tenderedConsonance: identical consonant sound at end of word preceded by different vowel:Home, same, breath, worth

45 Dramatic Situation?

46 Conflict?There is a lot of tension between the speaker and listener. We get the impression that the listener is not given much chance to speak - or, if they do, that it is ignored

47 As readers, we cannot be sure whose memory is more accurate - the parents' or the child's.
Is the child exaggerating about the horrors that appear to have taken place? Or are the parents guiltily trying to convince themselves that they didn't happen?

48 StructureThe poem consists of six stanzas of three lines, each of roughly the same length.Each stanza begins with a statement that denies what the child believes to have happened - 'Nobody hurt you'

49 LanguageThere are many frightening ideas in the poem that are suggested but not developed:"The bad man on the moors" (line 2),a door being locked (line 3),the child being "sent ... away" (line 13).definite sense of fear on the part of the child."skidmarks of sin" (line 16) are and what is meant by “laid you wide open for Hell" (line 17).

50 violent verbs -'hurt, argued, forced, begged' - which add to the sense of danger.

51 Onomatopoeia is used to describe the voices, "Boom. Boom. Boom
Onomatopoeia is used to describe the voices, "Boom. Boom. Boom. We associate a booming sound with explosions and bombs,It is ironic that the parent uses the metaphor "called the tune" (line 10) to indicate the control they had over the child, when the 'music' produced was so violent.

52 theme "the secret police of your childhood”
Poem about memory, childhood, truth lies.A parent trying to soft peddle a difficult childhood?

53 For Tomorrow Commentary on Standing Female Nude
Socratic Seminar Ticket 10 pts.I am collecting both.

54 Stealing: central questions
Why does Duffy use a contrast of colloquial and poetic diction? What is the effect?Discuss the central image of the snowman in the poem. How does Duffy use it?

55 Colloquialism: in a conversational manner that may include slang:
Connotations: emotional association a reader has for a certain word:Alliteration: repetition of consonant sounds at beginning of sentences;Assonance: repetition of same vowel sound: open, broken; remembered, tendered

56 Stealing Dramatic Situation? Dramatic Monologue Angry tone
Speaker? Who is he talking to?

57 Structure 5-5lined regular verse. Unrhymed and irregular in meter.
Begins and ends with question.Nothing unusual about syntaxStanzas control the poem…keep it from spilling over. Contains the energy

58 Language Slang: “Better off dead.” One word sentences
Lyrical lines: “A tall white mute/beneth the winter moon.” Why?Sharp violent verbs: piercing my gutSlice of ice. Why?

59 language Metaphor: snowman, Why significant?
Simile: “ a mind as cold as the slice of ice within my own brain.Caesuras in the middle of the lines. Why effective

60 Musical devicesInternal rhyme: “I started with the head/ better off deadSlice of iceAlliteration: ripped out in ragsRepetition: Again. Again.Assonance: mute, moon, mats, mind:

61 For Monday Shooting Stars
Annotate poem. Use different colors highlighters or pencils. If you don’t have that use boxes, circles and underlines.One color for imagesOne color for diction (words that seem carefully chosen for effectPunctuationWrite a working Thesis at the bottom or top of page.. Don’t write a commentary until after we discuss it on Monday

62 Standing Female NudeTitle Poem of her first Collection of poetry: Standing Female Nude1985

63 PicassoStanding Female Nude

64 The Grand Nude; 1908Gorges Braque

65 Who has more power in this poem?
What is Duffy saying about art?

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